THEME BY PISTACHI-O

Huffington Post calls the shit out of LGBT organizations for doing nearly nothing for the T. 

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

thtqueerlyfe:

creatureboy:

assholedansavage:

i-ate-jims-crow-with-hot-sauce:

iragray:

TW: CISSEXISM AND BRUTAL VIOLENCE

… imagine a 19-year-old girl being dropped off at an acquaintance’s home by a taxi on a Sunday night and finding three men on the lawn waiting for her. Imagine them kidnapping, torturing, decapitating, dismembering and burning her alive for sport, as young, raucous boys would to a Barbie doll. Imagine them chucking her torso on the side of a highway, with absolutely no regret or sense of immorality. Imagine being the mother called into the morgue to identify a defiled torso as your daughter. Swallow that bitter pill of reality and tell me that marriage is the most important issue for the LGBT community in 2011. For several in the transgender community, it might as well be 1969 all over again, because nothing has changed for them.

Fucking thank you. We’re getting beat the fuck up and murdered, and their biggest concern is gay marriage.

Oh.

Okay then.

Cool.

“I have nothing against marriage equality; I believe in it. But I also know that marriage means nothing if we aren’t alive or otherwise able to enjoy it.”

YES.

Yeah, the whole “we want gay marriage!” whilst I have to worry about myself or my friends getting killed all the time kinda sucks. This is why the gay community sucks balls and I don’t identify with them.

Hi, queer anarcho feminist scene! LOVE YOU!

This is what I aim to change in LGBTQ organizations. I want the focus to be on greater issues, more grave issues.

I just want to repeat that Shelley Hillard was black.

Not just trans.

BLACK and trans. THAT MEANS SOMETHING.

For those of you hoping to follow the situation in Syria 

postregime:

Might I recommend the following resources (For all but the “overview” sources, I’ve focused on sources that are based out of Syria, live-update and are available to the non-arabic speaker)

Overview of the Revolution:

Blogs:

Twitter Accounts (Mostly English):

Youtube Channels

subconciousevolution:

Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue Pushes Actresses Of Color Aside (Again!)

The 2012 Hollywood Issue cover of Vanity Fair — shot by Mario Testino — features 11 “starlets” shot in satin and feathers for a “‘20s and ’30s boudoir feel.” The ladies on the power panel — the left third, aka the actual newsstand cover — are Rooney Mara, Mia Wasikowska, Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain. Pariah’s Adepero Oduye and Mission Impossible’s Paula Patton are the only two ladies of color, and they are not on the power panel, but on the right two-thirds of the cover, which is folded up and tucked away when on newsstands.

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This cover (click to enlarge) is an improvement from the 2010 Young Hollywood cover, which only featured white actresses. But it upholds the unfortunate tradition of shoving the people of color to the right and off if the main panel. Something Vanity Fair has been doing for years. (Usually Annie Leibovitz has been the photographer.)

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In 2011, Norman Jean Roy’s photograph had Anthony Mackie and Rashida Jones off to the right.


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In 2008, it was Zoë Saldana and America Ferrera. (In 2007, Chris Rock was indeed on the cover and some penguins were on the right. 2006 was Tom Ford and some naked ladies. Black folks also appeared on the Hollywood issue cover in1998 — Djimon Hounsou — and 1999 — Thandie Newton.)


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2005: Rosario Dawson, Ziyi Zhang and Kerry Washington, on the right and not the left.


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2004: Salma Hayek and Lucy Liu, on the right and not the left power panel.


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2003: Samuel L. Jackson and Don Cheadle, off the cover.


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2002, Rosario Dawson.


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In 2001, no black ladies were pushed aside because no black ladies were photographed!


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1997: Jada Pinkett and Jennifer Lopez on the right.


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1996: Will Smith on the right.


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1995: Angela Basset on the right
2011 was supposedly the whitest Oscars in 10 years. This year, thanks to the decidedly controversial flick The Help, Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer have been nominated (and winning!) some major awards. But it’s pretty obvious that Hollywood has a serious problem with diversity. A headline on ColorLines yesterday read: Why is Hollywood So Afraid of Black Women? Of course, it’s not just women; George Lucas recently accused Hollywood of being so racist even he, a successful filmmaker, had trouble getting Red Tails distributed, since it has an all-black cast.
America has a black president. We also have black actresses being recognized for playing maids in a film based on a book written by a white woman who got sued by her family’s black maid who claims the story is “embarrassing” and “emotionally upsetting.” Hollywood might be one of our biggest exports to the rest of the world, but it’s pretty clear it needs an overhaul. Fast.
Read the Article Here. 

subconciousevolution:

Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue Pushes Actresses Of Color Aside (Again!)


The 2012 Hollywood Issue cover of Vanity Fair — shot by Mario Testino — features 11 “starlets” shot in satin and feathers for a “‘20s and ’30s boudoir feel.” The ladies on the power panel — the left third, aka the actual newsstand cover — are Rooney Mara, Mia Wasikowska, Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain. Pariah’s Adepero Oduye and Mission Impossible’s Paula Patton are the only two ladies of color, and they are not on the power panel, but on the right two-thirds of the cover, which is folded up and tucked away when on newsstands.

This cover (click to enlarge) is an improvement from the 2010 Young Hollywood cover, which only featured white actresses. But it upholds the unfortunate tradition of shoving the people of color to the right and off if the main panel. Something Vanity Fair has been doing for years. (Usually Annie Leibovitz has been the photographer.)

In 2011, Norman Jean Roy’s photograph had Anthony Mackie and Rashida Jones off to the right.

In 2008, it was Zoë Saldana and America Ferrera. (In 2007, Chris Rock was indeed on the cover and some penguins were on the right. 2006 was Tom Ford and some naked ladies. Black folks also appeared on the Hollywood issue cover in1998 — Djimon Hounsou — and 1999 — Thandie Newton.)

2005: Rosario Dawson, Ziyi Zhang and Kerry Washington, on the right and not the left.

2004: Salma Hayek and Lucy Liu, on the right and not the left power panel.

2003: Samuel L. Jackson and Don Cheadle, off the cover.

2002, Rosario Dawson.

In 2001, no black ladies were pushed aside because no black ladies were photographed!

1997: Jada Pinkett and Jennifer Lopez on the right.

1996: Will Smith on the right.

1995: Angela Basset on the right

2011 was supposedly the whitest Oscars in 10 years. This year, thanks to the decidedly controversial flick The Help, Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer have been nominated (and winning!) some major awards. But it’s pretty obvious that Hollywood has a serious problem with diversity. A headline on ColorLines yesterday read: Why is Hollywood So Afraid of Black Women? Of course, it’s not just women; George Lucas recently accused Hollywood of being so racist even he, a successful filmmaker, had trouble getting Red Tails distributed, since it has an all-black cast.

America has a black president. We also have black actresses being recognized for playing maids in a film based on a book written by a white woman who got sued by her family’s black maid who claims the story is “embarrassing” and “emotionally upsetting.” Hollywood might be one of our biggest exports to the rest of the world, but it’s pretty clear it needs an overhaul. Fast.

Read the Article Here. 

fauxkaren:

A Message to Women From a Man: You Are Not “Crazy”

This is a really interesting article about the way in which women are socialized to apologize and be defensive of their emotions. A couple of choice quotes:

You’re so sensitive. You’re so emotional. You’re defensive. You’re overreacting. Calm down. Relax. Stop freaking out! You’re crazy! I was just joking, don’t you have a sense of humor? You’re so dramatic. Just get over it already!

Sound familiar?

If you’re a woman, it probably does.

and

It’s a whole lot easier to emotionally manipulate someone who has been conditioned by our society to accept it. We continue to burden women because they don’t refuse our burdens as easily. It’s the ultimate cowardice.

Whether gaslighting is conscious or not, it produces the same result: It renders some women emotionally mute.

These women aren’t able to clearly express to their spouses that what is said or done to them is hurtful. They can’t tell their boss that his behavior is disrespectful and prevents them from doing their best work. They can’t tell their parents that, when they are being critical, they are doing more harm than good.

When these women receive any sort of push back to their reactions, they often brush it off by saying, “Forget it, it’s okay.”

That “forget it” isn’t just about dismissing a thought, it is about self-dismissal. It’s heartbreaking.