THEME BY PISTACHI-O

blackbabesupremacy:

samwilson-bootyenthusiast:

killacamz:

just a reminder that this was 50 year ago

And even when those signs came down and technically integration was legal black folks were still getting their asses beat for daring to do things around white people.

Integration aint help nobody

What is Ferguson doing on Europe's front pages? 

Timeline of a tragedy: The Michael Brown story so far 

shortformblog:

msnbc:

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Violence continues to erupt in Ferguson, Mo., more than a week after the fatal shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown by policeman Darren Wilson. The 18-year-old’s family demands justice be brought to their son with the arrest of the six-year veteran officer. Protesters have clashed with authorities as control over security shifted from local police to St. Louis County officers to the Missouri State Highway Patrol. Gov. Jay Nixon has since called in the Missouri National Guard. And the Brown family continues to prepare for the teenager’s funeral arrangements amid completion of three separate autopsies.

http://on.msnbc.com/1vepKqA

Great timeline.

nyctaeus:

On the streets of Ferguson, Missouri. 
Photos by Alex Welch

nowinexile:

The last words said by Black youth murdered by policemen. 

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victicms. 

politicalsexkitten:

curvesincolor:

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via The Huffington Post.

"It has nothing to do with race"

"

Let me be clear: Unarmed college hopefuls don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids heading to work or trade school don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids floundering aimlessly through life don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids who have been in trouble—even those who have been nothing but trouble—don’t deserve to be shot.

The act of pinning the tragedy of a dead black teen to his potential future success, to his respectability, to his “good”-ness, is done with all the best intentions. But if you read between the lines, aren’t we really saying that had he not been on his way to college, there’d be less to mourn?

That’s dead wrong.

"  - Black Kids Don’t Have to Be College-Bound for Their Deaths to Be Tragic by Jasmine Banks (via gwest650)

gradientlair:

While Black experiences with racism and anti-Blackness are used as analogies/metaphors and narratives to shape the experiences of non-Black people while erasing Black people’s experiences and humanity (as I discussed in White People Using Blackness and Anti-Black Racism Analogies For Their Experiences Is NOT Intersectionality), these experiences past and present are indicative of our lives, our history, our deaths. A reality. Not an anecdote to lead into something else. 

Michael Brown's execution and all of these extrajudicial executions are indicative of violence that never was truly “past” as it is always present. And it is a REALITY—not a metaphor—with a human cost in Black mental and physical health, in Black safety, in Black bodies. 

Below are the links mentioned in the tweets that I sent above: Black Women Were Lynched TooConsuming Black DeathFamily of Michael Brown, Teenager Shot to Death By Ferguson Police, Talks About His Life.

And look, I am disinterested in White supremacist sociopaths, anti-Black non-Black people of colour or unfortunately some Black people who have internalized racism and believe that the politics of respectability can protect us to now throw out the violent lie, derailment and misnomer (“Black on Black crime” is a misnomer and epistemic violence) that Black people “don’t care about intraracial crime.” This is a VIOLENT type of derailment and is dehumanization. When every race has intraracial crime yet only Black people are deemed to “not care” despite evidence to contrary and then civilian crime is juxtaposed to extrajudicial executions as modern lynchings and State violence? The false equalization is not solely epistemic violence; it is a direct attack on the mental health and well-being of Black people. Save it. (And notably, this derailment only addresses violence between cishet Black men; never a mention about any other Black people cared about or not.)

Black life is valuable in it of itself. Not solely as a trope for consumption with erasure and a demand that we feel gleeful about the erasure to prove “solidarity.” Anti-Blackness and misogynoir are not “progressive.” Michael Brown’s life MATTERED…FULL STOP.

Peace to every Black victim and family of this violence. (My own family is one of them, by the way.)

Peace to Michael Brown’s mother and his family. 

wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:


Laverne Cox talks to TIME about the transgender movement

side note: i don’t like the “next civil rights” language on the cover because it erases the fact that laverne’s experiences aren’t just that of being a trans woman. laverne cox is a black trans woman. that is important.
to suggest that the ongoing lack of civil rights for black folks in this country doesn’t directly inform the particular form of transmisogyny she receives is ridiculous in a world where black trans women are disproportionately affected by both physical and economic violence.

^^^^^ very true

wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:

Laverne Cox talks to TIME about the transgender movement

side note: i don’t like the “next civil rights” language on the cover because it erases the fact that laverne’s experiences aren’t just that of being a trans woman. laverne cox is a black trans woman. that is important.

to suggest that the ongoing lack of civil rights for black folks in this country doesn’t directly inform the particular form of transmisogyny she receives is ridiculous in a world where black trans women are disproportionately affected by both physical and economic violence.

^^^^^ very true

helms-deep:

Way to do it, Clippers. Classy way to show solidarity, stand together, and tell the world how you feel about your despicable, hateful owner.

Donald Sterling’s Revealing Racism 

newyorker:

Amy Davidson on the Los Angeles Clippers owner’s racist remarks: http://nyr.kr/1h6Y5jk

“What are we saying, really, when we ask how an N.B.A. owner, of all people, could say those things? Is the idea that part of the job is putting on a non-racist mask that somehow isn’t required elsewhere in society?”

Photograph by Danny Moloshok/AP.