THEME BY PISTACHI-O
wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:


Laverne Cox talks to TIME about the transgender movement

side note: i don’t like the “next civil rights” language on the cover because it erases the fact that laverne’s experiences aren’t just that of being a trans woman. laverne cox is a black trans woman. that is important.
to suggest that the ongoing lack of civil rights for black folks in this country doesn’t directly inform the particular form of transmisogyny she receives is ridiculous in a world where black trans women are disproportionately affected by both physical and economic violence.

^^^^^ very true

wocinsolidarity:

ethiopienne:

Laverne Cox talks to TIME about the transgender movement

side note: i don’t like the “next civil rights” language on the cover because it erases the fact that laverne’s experiences aren’t just that of being a trans woman. laverne cox is a black trans woman. that is important.

to suggest that the ongoing lack of civil rights for black folks in this country doesn’t directly inform the particular form of transmisogyny she receives is ridiculous in a world where black trans women are disproportionately affected by both physical and economic violence.

^^^^^ very true

helms-deep:

Way to do it, Clippers. Classy way to show solidarity, stand together, and tell the world how you feel about your despicable, hateful owner.

Donald Sterling’s Revealing Racism 

newyorker:

Amy Davidson on the Los Angeles Clippers owner’s racist remarks: http://nyr.kr/1h6Y5jk

“What are we saying, really, when we ask how an N.B.A. owner, of all people, could say those things? Is the idea that part of the job is putting on a non-racist mask that somehow isn’t required elsewhere in society?”

Photograph by Danny Moloshok/AP.

HBO Using Rap to Promote Game of Thrones to "Multicultural" Audience 

fatpinkcast:

HBO knows white people love Game of Thrones. HBO thinks black people love hip-hop. HBO hopes that by mixing Game of Thrones and hip-hop, black people will love Game of Thrones, too.

In an article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Unlikely Mix: Rappers, Dragons and Fantasy,” Time Warner Inc.’s HBO outlines its plan to attract “urban” viewers with the release of a new mixtape on Friday called, oh yes, “Catch the Throne.”

How will they attract these “multicultural” audiences? By investing in sick beats like this:

I’m tellin’ whoever messin’ with me

I can bring you that Khaleesi heat

Use my King, knack for words, as an actual sword

I can decapitate a rapper…

Why does HBO think this strategy will work?

Over the years, rappers have influenced the buying habits and brand preferences of urban audiences just by mentioning the items in a song, helping to drive sales of everything from Dom Pérignon champagne to Nike basketball shoes.

Where did HBO’s initial idea for a mixtape come from?

The latest effort began after HBO’s marketing executives realized that “celebrity influencers”—famous rappers and others with large followings on social media and the radio—from the hip-hop world were fans of the show. Magazeen, a Jamaican-born dancehall-rap artist, says he watches “Game of Thrones” on DVD while on tour, and that his favorite character is the murderous boy-prince Joffrey Baratheon.

"It’s a lot of sword-swinging, a lot of fighting, man—It’s just raw!" Magazeen said.

So how does “Catch the Throne” contributor Common feel about GOT and the crazy ending to the third season?

Chicago-based rapper and actor Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr., better known by his stage name, Common, said that he has watched “Game of Thrones” through the middle of Season 2, and said he loves its complexity and the depth of characters such as Tyrion Lannister, a raconteur, womanizer and royal adviser played by Peter Dinklage.

What will his rap be about?

Common said his song on the mixtape is about what it feels like to battle to be top dog, and the things people are willing to do get there. “I sit and think when I’m in my zone / This life is like a Game of Thrones,” he raps over a rising swell of strings and timpani drums.

How much did it cost for HBO produce this brag-worthy “authentic” mixtape with artists such as Wale, Big Boi, Common, Daddy Yankee, and Bodega Bamz?

HBO declined to say how much the campaign cost or how much the artists are being paid.

Who will download and love this mixtape?

Probably white dudes.

fucknofetishization:

Asian American and Asian women stereotypes

If you’re willing to sit through a 15 minute video, take some time to see this. This video explains where the stereotypes and fetishization of Asian women came from.

redamancer:

coonami:

Why

holy shit okay this is, again, people applying western race relations to other countries and i will not have it
japan is notorious, absolutely notorious for fetishizing and being outright racist when it comes to stereotypes and other races. if you live in japan or you’ve ever experienced what it’s like to be a non-japanese person in japan,
japan is not the united states. the race dynamics are incredibly different. there are plenty of restaurants and businesses which have the sign ‘japanese only’ brazenly hung outside their walls. if you’re korean in japan? good fucking luck taking on the immense amount of racism that both the government and the general populace will hurl your way. there are third generation korean kids, who for three generations have had their families live in japan, who do not have japanese citizen ship purely based on the fact they have korean blood in them.
black people? a joke too. in japan they’re all buff, they’re all angry, and there is little presented to the country outside of outrageous stereotypes.
white people? you’re ignorant or you’re all idiots. that’s the truth, and it starts to deviate once you get into country by country. americans are all loud and fat and ignorant. british people are all upper class or fucking royalty of some kind. 
so yes, it is offense. it’s offensive to not ‘white people’ in america, it’s offensive to the white demographic of japan, who funnily enough, don’t benefit from white privilege in a country in which they are not the ones on top of the ruling power structure.
i’m so sick and tired of westerners applying their racial dynamics to countries that have nothing to fucking do with them. 
what’s even worse is white bloggers reblogging this going ‘oooh lmao’ about a country that has nothing to do with their racial politics in an attempt to seem more open-minded, which has the opposite effect when you’re basically imprinting your own views and your own country’s status on to another country’s. but i guess colonialism is dead, right?
not everywhere is america for fuck’s sake

redamancer:

coonami:

Why

holy shit okay this is, again, people applying western race relations to other countries and i will not have it

japan is notorious, absolutely notorious for fetishizing and being outright racist when it comes to stereotypes and other races. if you live in japan or you’ve ever experienced what it’s like to be a non-japanese person in japan,

japan is not the united states. the race dynamics are incredibly different. there are plenty of restaurants and businesses which have the sign ‘japanese only’ brazenly hung outside their walls. if you’re korean in japan? good fucking luck taking on the immense amount of racism that both the government and the general populace will hurl your way. there are third generation korean kids, who for three generations have had their families live in japan, who do not have japanese citizen ship purely based on the fact they have korean blood in them.

black people? a joke too. in japan they’re all buff, they’re all angry, and there is little presented to the country outside of outrageous stereotypes.

white people? you’re ignorant or you’re all idiots. that’s the truth, and it starts to deviate once you get into country by country. americans are all loud and fat and ignorant. british people are all upper class or fucking royalty of some kind. 

so yes, it is offense. it’s offensive to not ‘white people’ in america, it’s offensive to the white demographic of japan, who funnily enough, don’t benefit from white privilege in a country in which they are not the ones on top of the ruling power structure.

i’m so sick and tired of westerners applying their racial dynamics to countries that have nothing to fucking do with them. 

what’s even worse is white bloggers reblogging this going ‘oooh lmao’ about a country that has nothing to do with their racial politics in an attempt to seem more open-minded, which has the opposite effect when you’re basically imprinting your own views and your own country’s status on to another country’s. but i guess colonialism is dead, right?

not everywhere is america for fuck’s sake

The tweet that sparked a debate over racism in Norway | BBC 

allerascrooge:

amazing-how-you-love:

america-wakiewakie:

A simple tweet from a university student of Somali origin in Norway has triggered a big debate in the country over racism.

It started with a tweet. On Sunday evening, medical student Warsan Ismail began to list a series of everyday examples of racism she and her family have experienced in Norway. She began with the story of how, when she was just five, her neighbours set a pair of dogs after her mother. In 140 characters, she continued with anecdote after anecdote - each one tagged with the hashtag #norskrasisme, or “Norwegian racism”.

Within minutes, many others tweeted similar stories. By the end of the evening, it was one of the top trending terms on Twitter in Norway. Ismail was soon interviewed by major newspapers and on Norwegian TV. To date, there have been more than 6,000 tweets using the hashtag - and it’s still on the up.

"I love my country, I wouldn’t live anywhere else but Norway - but still this is an issue we need to debate," says Lubna Jaffery, a former Norwegian politician of Pakistani descent, who also joined the Twitter discussion. An example she gave was when a woman called her and her three-year-old daughter “disgusting” as they were getting off a bus. There are laws in Norway against racism in the workplace, she says, but “on a bus or in the street you don’t have any chance to defend yourself”.

"We have a self-image that we are post-racist, or above racism in Norway," says Gunnar Helliesen, an IT specialist who has tweeted 22 times using the hashtag. Helliesen feels particularly attuned to the subject as his wife is Caribbean-American. Norway is not necessarily more racist than a country like the US, he says - but when there is racist abuse in public, Americans will pipe up, while Norwegians tend to look the other way.

Some of the tweets using the hashtag have been from white Norwegians, expressing concern about the level of immigration. A few have been quite inflammatory. Ismail told the BBC that she is delighted the issue of racism is being debated, but for now, she wants to step out the limelight.

Poc use hashtag to expose and heal from racism, white people use it — to be more racist.

I’ve been told more than once about how people in Scandinavia love people who look like me, and how accepting they are etc., I just need to file news like this away in my memory bank so when people talk about how racism in the US is so much worse, or that people of colour don’t suffer every day microaggressions in Europe, I can pull up perfect examples of how wrong that is. Just because there aren’t open and honest discussions about race, doesn’t mean that racism doesn’t exist or isn’t just as bad. It just means you’re ignoring the problem instead of confronting it.

medievalpoc:

poc-creators:

note-a-bear:

covenesque:

comradeocean:

comradeocean:

jacquestati:

currywithrice:


jahalath:


zuky:


abagond:


Broomberg and Chanarin say their work, on show at Johannesburg’s Goodman Gallery, examines “the radical notion that prejudice might be inherent in the medium of photography itself”. They argue that early colour film was predicated on white skin: in 1977, when Jean-Luc Godard was invited on an assignment to Mozambique, he refused to use Kodak film on the grounds that the stock was inherently “racist”.
The light range was so narrow, Broomberg said, that “if you exposed film for a white kid, the black kid sitting next to him would be rendered invisible except for the whites of his eyes and teeth”. It was only when Kodak’s two biggest clients – the confectionary and furniture industries – complained that dark chocolate and dark furniture were losing out that it came up with a solution.
‘Racism’ of early colour photography | Guardian


Makes perfect sense to me. The human eye always adjusts to see people’s faces but the technology of photography developed around adjusting to white people only. You can probably dig deeper and look at the cultural institution that developed around photography for what came to be accepted as “what the camera likes” and the aesthetics of palettes and light conditions and such for more normalization of racist standards. Same can probably be said of a great deal of Eurocentric art, aesthetics, and technology in general.


So glad someone identified this tendency. When I did photography, I found my POC friends impossible to light with the reccomendations given by most photography blogs and such. I also found no techniques on how to photograph people with darker skin tones because even DSLRS require different types of exposures for darker skin.


Are these people serious


Yep cause it’s true
Film is an inherently racist medium, which seems unfortunately to bemost discussed by white authors (Richard Dyer, though, does have a lot of good information in White)
But when Spike Lee has to come up with his own methods of cinematography to film black people, something is definitely wrong
Or when I show up as a dark blob in photos with my white friends, or when I’m the only one who’s face isn’t picked up by any recognition technology, then I’d say film and photography are definitely racist media
edit-
idk how much we should be taking cues on racism from JLG tbh

Also the filters that get used for photo editing (digital and otherwise). Like, I think loads of pictures are specially developed with this blue tone that really lightens people up (while also making everything look washed out). And all the common tutorials (both on tumblr and elsewhere) to improve the lighting/image quality of screencaps for edits and gifs are totally useless for darker skin tones. I wish there were better fandom resources for this shit because it’s fucking frustrating.

reblogging to add:
‘12 Years a Slave,’ ‘Mother of George,’ and the aesthetic politics of filming black skin: (via cinematocat/cesaire)

“Montré Aza Missouri, an assistant professor in film at Howard University, recalls being told by one of her instructors in London that “if you found yourself in the ‘unfortunate situation’ of shooting on the ‘Dark Continent,’ and if you’re shooting dark-skinned people, then you should rub Vaseline on their skin in order to reflect light. It was never an issue of questioning the technology.” In her classes at Howard, Missouri says, “I talk to my students about the idea that the tools used to make film, the science of it, are not racially neutral.” 
Missouri reminds her students that the sensors used in light meters have been calibrated for white skin; rather than resorting to the offensive Vaseline solution, they need to manage the built-in bias of their instruments, in this case opening their cameras’ apertures one or two stops to allow more light through the lens. Filmmakers working with celluloid also need to take into account that most American film stocks weren’t manufactured with a sensitive enough dynamic range to capture a variety of dark skin tones. Even the female models whose images are used as reference points for color balance and tonal density during film processing — commonly called “China Girls” — were, until the mid-1990s, historically white. 
In the face of such technological chauvinism, filmmakers have been forced to come up with workarounds, including those lights thrown on Poitier and a variety of gels, scrims and filters. But today, such workarounds have been rendered virtually obsolete by the advent of digital cinematography, which allows filmmakers much more flexibility both in capturing images and manipulating them during post-production.”

and from the original article:

The artists feel certain that the ID-2 camera and its boost button were Polaroid’s answer to South Africa’s very specific need. “Black skin absorbs 42% more light. The button boosts the flash exactly 42%,” Broomberg explained. “It makes me believe it was designed for this purpose.”
In 1970 Caroline Hunter, a young chemist working for Polaroid in America, stumbled upon evidence that the company was effectively supporting apartheid. She and her partner Ken Williams formed the Polaroid Workers Revolutionary Movement and campaigned for a boycott. By 1977 Polaroid had withdrawn from South Africa, spurring an international divestment movement that was crucial to bringing down apartheid.
The title of the exhibition, To Photograph the Details of a Dark Horse in Low Light, refers to the coded phrase used by Kodak to describe a new film stock created in the early 1980s to address the inability of earlier films to accurately render dark skin.
The show also features norm reference cards that always used white women as a standard for measuring and calibrating skin tones when printing photographs. The series of “Kodak Shirleys” were named after the first model featured. Today such cards show multiple races.


Forever reblog with added commentary

Yes! It’s back! I was trying to find this post

Added information. I really really need a book on cinematography techniques for lighting darker skin tones

I’ve posted information about this before, and I want to reblog it again because it’s so important.
People really need to understand what it means that racism is built into so many of our technologies, our education, our lives…too many people seem to believe that racism is about feelings and interactions.
A lot of the photos I have posted of artworks are old photographs that use films that oversaturate dark skin tones or blast them out with contrast. They need to be modified where possible in order for dark skinned people portrayed in the paintings to be visible at all.

medievalpoc:

poc-creators:

note-a-bear:

covenesque:

comradeocean:

comradeocean:

jacquestati:

currywithrice:

jahalath:

zuky:

abagond:

Broomberg and Chanarin say their work, on show at Johannesburg’s Goodman Gallery, examines “the radical notion that prejudice might be inherent in the medium of photography itself”. They argue that early colour film was predicated on white skin: in 1977, when Jean-Luc Godard was invited on an assignment to Mozambique, he refused to use Kodak film on the grounds that the stock was inherently “racist”.

The light range was so narrow, Broomberg said, that “if you exposed film for a white kid, the black kid sitting next to him would be rendered invisible except for the whites of his eyes and teeth”. It was only when Kodak’s two biggest clients – the confectionary and furniture industries – complained that dark chocolate and dark furniture were losing out that it came up with a solution.

‘Racism’ of early colour photography | Guardian

Makes perfect sense to me. The human eye always adjusts to see people’s faces but the technology of photography developed around adjusting to white people only. You can probably dig deeper and look at the cultural institution that developed around photography for what came to be accepted as “what the camera likes” and the aesthetics of palettes and light conditions and such for more normalization of racist standards. Same can probably be said of a great deal of Eurocentric art, aesthetics, and technology in general.

So glad someone identified this tendency. When I did photography, I found my POC friends impossible to light with the reccomendations given by most photography blogs and such. I also found no techniques on how to photograph people with darker skin tones because even DSLRS require different types of exposures for darker skin.

Are these people serious

Yep cause it’s true

Film is an inherently racist medium, which seems unfortunately to bemost discussed by white authors (Richard Dyer, though, does have a lot of good information in White)

But when Spike Lee has to come up with his own methods of cinematography to film black people, something is definitely wrong

Or when I show up as a dark blob in photos with my white friends, or when I’m the only one who’s face isn’t picked up by any recognition technology, then I’d say film and photography are definitely racist media

edit-

idk how much we should be taking cues on racism from JLG tbh

Also the filters that get used for photo editing (digital and otherwise). Like, I think loads of pictures are specially developed with this blue tone that really lightens people up (while also making everything look washed out). And all the common tutorials (both on tumblr and elsewhere) to improve the lighting/image quality of screencaps for edits and gifs are totally useless for darker skin tones. I wish there were better fandom resources for this shit because it’s fucking frustrating.

reblogging to add:

‘12 Years a Slave,’ ‘Mother of George,’ and the aesthetic politics of filming black skin: (via cinematocat/cesaire)

“Montré Aza Missouri, an assistant professor in film at Howard University, recalls being told by one of her instructors in London that “if you found yourself in the ‘unfortunate situation’ of shooting on the ‘Dark Continent,’ and if you’re shooting dark-skinned people, then you should rub Vaseline on their skin in order to reflect light. It was never an issue of questioning the technology.” In her classes at Howard, Missouri says, “I talk to my students about the idea that the tools used to make film, the science of it, are not racially neutral.”

Missouri reminds her students that the sensors used in light meters have been calibrated for white skin; rather than resorting to the offensive Vaseline solution, they need to manage the built-in bias of their instruments, in this case opening their cameras’ apertures one or two stops to allow more light through the lens. Filmmakers working with celluloid also need to take into account that most American film stocks weren’t manufactured with a sensitive enough dynamic range to capture a variety of dark skin tones. Even the female models whose images are used as reference points for color balance and tonal density during film processing — commonly called “China Girls” — were, until the mid-1990s, historically white.

In the face of such technological chauvinism, filmmakers have been forced to come up with workarounds, including those lights thrown on Poitier and a variety of gels, scrims and filters. But today, such workarounds have been rendered virtually obsolete by the advent of digital cinematography, which allows filmmakers much more flexibility both in capturing images and manipulating them during post-production.”

and from the original article:

The artists feel certain that the ID-2 camera and its boost button were Polaroid’s answer to South Africa’s very specific need. “Black skin absorbs 42% more light. The button boosts the flash exactly 42%,” Broomberg explained. “It makes me believe it was designed for this purpose.”

In 1970 Caroline Hunter, a young chemist working for Polaroid in America, stumbled upon evidence that the company was effectively supporting apartheid. She and her partner Ken Williams formed the Polaroid Workers Revolutionary Movement and campaigned for a boycott. By 1977 Polaroid had withdrawn from South Africa, spurring an international divestment movement that was crucial to bringing down apartheid.

The title of the exhibition, To Photograph the Details of a Dark Horse in Low Light, refers to the coded phrase used by Kodak to describe a new film stock created in the early 1980s to address the inability of earlier films to accurately render dark skin.

The show also features norm reference cards that always used white women as a standard for measuring and calibrating skin tones when printing photographs. The series of “Kodak Shirleys” were named after the first model featured. Today such cards show multiple races.

Forever reblog with added commentary

Yes! It’s back! I was trying to find this post

Added information. I really really need a book on cinematography techniques for lighting darker skin tones

I’ve posted information about this before, and I want to reblog it again because it’s so important.

People really need to understand what it means that racism is built into so many of our technologies, our education, our lives…too many people seem to believe that racism is about feelings and interactions.

A lot of the photos I have posted of artworks are old photographs that use films that oversaturate dark skin tones or blast them out with contrast. They need to be modified where possible in order for dark skinned people portrayed in the paintings to be visible at all.

Katy Perry's racist performance of "Unconditionally" at the American Music Awards 

feministinthekitchen:

  • Katy Perry might as well just have been singing “LONG TIIIIIIIIIME I WILL LOVE YOU LONGGGGG TIMMMEEEEEEEEE” and mixing up her L and R sounds. That is how horrendously racist this performance was.
  • This is absolutely no different than Miley Cyrus’ use of black female bodies in her We Can’t Stop music video and VMAs performance or Lily Allen’s use of black female bodies in her Hard Out Here music video or Selena Gomez’s use of South Asian culture in her Come And Get It music video. All of these videos and performances co-opt aspects of different cultures, cartoonize them, and then marginalize people from those cultures.
  • I really honestly hope to see every single white feminist who vocally criticized Cyrus and Allen and Gomez out in full force against Katy Perry’s racist AMAs performance as well. Walk the talk.
  • It is not a coincidence that the messages of Gomez’s Come And Get It and Perry’s Unconditionally are being used in conjunction with Orientalist imagery from Asian cultures. The literal messages from these songs “when you’re ready come and get it” and “I will love you unconditionally” are ripe for being used to feed the racist western stereotype that all Asian women are constantly sexually available and willingly subservient to men.
  • When Perry bows and puts her hands together and cocks her head a little singing “I will love you unconditionally” at the end bit is just the subservient sexual availability of Asian women as it is understood in the west translated into pop choreography. That is what that is.
  • This song is not an homage to Japanese culture. It is simply an orientalist portrayal of the Greatest Hits of Japanese Culture As (Mis)Understood in the West: there are geisha in vaguely kimono-looking-garments, paper parasols, imagery from the Great Wave off Kanagawa, and a torii. Nothing about it is truly authentic or respectful.
  • This performance was a trainwreck and Katy Perry is a giant racist.

"

Allen’s first solo single since 2009 manages to scapegoat not just rappers but black women for all the insecurities she’s been grappling with over her career. The song begins with her scoffing at what is meant to look like a rap video complete with women of color body rolling in shorts. She then begins, “You’ll find me in the studio and not in the kitchen/I won’t be bragging ’bout my cars or talking ’bout my chains.” The elite prep school educated daughter of an actor and film producer finds such conspicuous consumption distasteful.

From Lorde to Macklemore, it’s a sentiment that’s galling for its popularity: white artists need to stop using the wealth signifiers of rap music to gesture at their self-important “anti-consumerism.” What Allen misses as she washes rims in a kitchen decorated only with bottles of champagne is that it’s not anti-consumerism when it only targets one type of consumer.

Rap owns a unique history soundtracking the triumph of financial success in a country that long barred black Americans from that success. It shouldn’t be an opportunity for white artists to wax superior. Beyond poor taste, it’s the myopia of latent racism that’s more anxious about gold chains on a rapper than an Armani tie on a hedge fund analyst.

Similarly, Lily Allen’s response to sexist industry demands for thinness becomes entirely ineffectual when it lashes out against women who succeed despite those demands. Allen is not savily critiquing the world of Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” and Miley Cyrus, she’s resentfully bemoaning not getting to enjoy the same success.

“Hard Out Here” is the opposite of Mileywave. Instead of using black women as props to further her career, Allen blames them for its stagnation. In full-sleeved dresses Allen mocks her inability to twerk amidst women of color in body suits who launch into exaggerated dance moves, licking their hands and then rubbing their crotch. Her older white male manager tries to get to her to mimic them. Meanwhile she sings, “Don’t need to shake my ass for you/‘Cause I’ve got a brain.” Cut to black women shaking their ass, so much for sisterly solidarity.

The spectacle feels like a corny send up of hip-hop dancers from someone who hasn’t seen many, reducing institutionalized misogyny to the success of a look Allen can’t master. The non-white women in Allen’s video act as dehumanized proxies of patriarchy—assumed to have neither brains nor agency—with Allen aiming all her contempt at them sideways.

While Rihanna releases strip club anthems that prioritize the female gaze, and Nicki Minaj regularly eviscerates the double standards of sexism in the music industry, Allen’s petulant sermon is both anachronistic and racist.

In a twitlonger post Allen addressed the allegations of racism by ignoring their substance:

“The video is meant to be a lighthearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture. It has nothing to do with race, at all…If I was a little braver, I would have been wearing a bikini too…What I’m trying to say is that me being covered up has nothing to do with me wanting to disassociate myself from the girls, it has more to do with my own insecurities and I just wanted to feel as comfortable as possible on the shoot day.”

The world would certainly be a better place if intent determined impact. But it doesn’t, and Allen’s ability to ignore race doesn’t dissolve her song’s major racial connotations. The video uses black bodies as the aggressors of Allen’s insecurities, juxtaposing them as physicalities Allen can’t replicate and thus finds worthy of ridicule. The song claims to be a feminist jab and has been cosigned by Lena Dunham as such, who accurately interpreted it “as pure rap-game parody.” By making rap music and its most visible participants the lightening rod for America’s social ills Allen acquits institutional patriarchy.

"  - Ayesha A. Siddiqi (via sugahwaatah)