THEME BY PISTACHI-O

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victicms. 

politicalsexkitten:

curvesincolor:

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via The Huffington Post.

"It has nothing to do with race"

"

The mistake people make when they talk about not being able to trust Wikipedia is in the implicit assumption that we could trust encyclopedias as infallible sources before Wikipedia.

I like Wikipedia because I know it could be wrong. Regular encyclopedias can be wrong, too, but my guard was never up in the same way with them as it is with Wikipedia. I like Internet media specifically for the reason that Aaron Sorkin doesn’t like it: because it makes it that much more difficult for me to have any illusions about the fact that the burden of critical thought is on me.

I don’t automatically trust bloggers because a group of people I’ve never met decided to give them a badge that says “reporter” on it. I don’t turn off my critical thinking because they’ve gotten to be some sort of “professional”. I have to judge them on the merits of their writing and history of thoughtfulness or thoughtlessness alone. That is a feature, not a bug, because we should never trust any news media outlet implicitly.

"  - On the Internet Everyone Knows You Could Be a Dog, or Why I Think Aaron Sorkin Is Wrong About the Value of Established Media Outlets (via thebreakfastbaron)

HBO Using Rap to Promote Game of Thrones to "Multicultural" Audience 

fatpinkcast:

HBO knows white people love Game of Thrones. HBO thinks black people love hip-hop. HBO hopes that by mixing Game of Thrones and hip-hop, black people will love Game of Thrones, too.

In an article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Unlikely Mix: Rappers, Dragons and Fantasy,” Time Warner Inc.’s HBO outlines its plan to attract “urban” viewers with the release of a new mixtape on Friday called, oh yes, “Catch the Throne.”

How will they attract these “multicultural” audiences? By investing in sick beats like this:

I’m tellin’ whoever messin’ with me

I can bring you that Khaleesi heat

Use my King, knack for words, as an actual sword

I can decapitate a rapper…

Why does HBO think this strategy will work?

Over the years, rappers have influenced the buying habits and brand preferences of urban audiences just by mentioning the items in a song, helping to drive sales of everything from Dom Pérignon champagne to Nike basketball shoes.

Where did HBO’s initial idea for a mixtape come from?

The latest effort began after HBO’s marketing executives realized that “celebrity influencers”—famous rappers and others with large followings on social media and the radio—from the hip-hop world were fans of the show. Magazeen, a Jamaican-born dancehall-rap artist, says he watches “Game of Thrones” on DVD while on tour, and that his favorite character is the murderous boy-prince Joffrey Baratheon.

"It’s a lot of sword-swinging, a lot of fighting, man—It’s just raw!" Magazeen said.

So how does “Catch the Throne” contributor Common feel about GOT and the crazy ending to the third season?

Chicago-based rapper and actor Lonnie Rashid Lynn Jr., better known by his stage name, Common, said that he has watched “Game of Thrones” through the middle of Season 2, and said he loves its complexity and the depth of characters such as Tyrion Lannister, a raconteur, womanizer and royal adviser played by Peter Dinklage.

What will his rap be about?

Common said his song on the mixtape is about what it feels like to battle to be top dog, and the things people are willing to do get there. “I sit and think when I’m in my zone / This life is like a Game of Thrones,” he raps over a rising swell of strings and timpani drums.

How much did it cost for HBO produce this brag-worthy “authentic” mixtape with artists such as Wale, Big Boi, Common, Daddy Yankee, and Bodega Bamz?

HBO declined to say how much the campaign cost or how much the artists are being paid.

Who will download and love this mixtape?

Probably white dudes.

machinablack:

2brwngrls:

yagazieemezi:

NEW YEAR POST

THE DAILY AFRICAN:

In 2001 Diesel launched a $15 million print campaign featuring a fictitious newspaper, The Daily African. Black models in Diesel jeans lounged in limos or lay across mahogany desks under headlines imagining Africa’s supremacy as a world power (“African Expedition to Explore Unknown Europe by Foot”).

It won that year’s Grand Prix at the International Advertising Festival in Cannes.

I still own this - I used to read it over and over and get my full fucking life. 

Iconic, tbqh. 

 I dig that aesthetic a lot.

"If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones."  -

Jane Espenson (from interview with Advocate.com)\

I dunno how many which ways this needs to be said

(via alienswithankhs)

"

Six years ago, I had a deal with Lifetime Television to develop my bestselling novel, The Dirty Girls Social Club, as a TV series. It soon became clear that the relationship wasn’t going to work, when two executives insisted that my pilot outline “wasn’t Latin enough,” because it told of middle class, educated American women who happened to be Latina.

“This reads as if it were about me and my friends,” complained one executive in disgust.

I didn’t know how to respond, so I asked her what she’d prefer.
“Why don’t we make the girls debating whether or not to date men in prison? I know that’s what Latinas talk about, just like it’s what black women talk about.”

"  -

Opinion: The problem with “Devious Maids” goes far beyond Hollywood

people always want to talk shit about us when we complain about fucked up representation…but these are the conversations happening in board rooms. like, jesus fucking christ. fuck this planet.

(via alienswithankhs)

Kerry Washington repping as the only WoC in THR's TV Actress Roundtable 

  • The Hollywood Reporter: What's your worst audition?
  • Connie Britton: "We just didn't get you."
  • Anna Gunn: "We just didn't respond to you."
  • Monica Potter: I'd just had my last kid..I was pushing like 180 pounds at the time. I'm like, "You guys, I just don't feel physically fit yet." I had my Spanx on and looked like a damn sausage, but I went in and thought I did a really good job. I got home and get the call from my agents. I'm like, "I did good, right?" And they say, "You did great. The problem is you're just …" "I'm too fat." "Yeah, we're just going to wait a little bit." I said, "I already told you this!" The weight thing is a crappy thing in this town, you know?
  • Elizabeth Moss: On the first season of "Mad Men," I had to wear a fat suit and prosthetic makeup to make me look bigger.... We all have this perception of what we're supposed to look like. But that's what's so great about all these women here today: We're all completely different-looking, you know? We're all beautiful, but real women.
  • Connie Britton: I agree. I've never had somebody say to me that I needed to look a certain way for a role, but I've always lived in dread of what that would be like. It's our responsibility to play these full-fledged women, and to play women who look like people we actually see in life. It's more interesting, and I think audiences appreciate it, too.
  • Kerry Washington: It's a little bit different for me because I'll audition for something and they'll just decide that they're not going "ethnic" with a character, which I hear a lot.
  • The Hollywood Reporter: Casting directors still use the word "ethnic"?
  • Kerry Washington: If not "black," then yeah. People have artistic license … that's what casting is: fitting the right look to the right character. Whereas you could maybe lose some weight, there's not really anything I can do, nor would I want to, about being black.

"3 percent of the decision-making in media comes from women. That means 97 percent of how women are portrayed is decided on by men."  -

Independent Lens, PBS
“Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines” (via ihopeyoucontinue4ever)

It also means that 97 percent of how men are portrayed in media are decided on by men. Something to remind MRAs and their ilk of when they complain about the stereotype of men as inept slobs, bad fathers, etc in media and advertising.

Men have the power. So when we men are shat on by the powers that be you don’t get to try and blame women for that.

(via karethdreams)

Why boys don’t read girls (sometimes) 

chasertiff:

shannonhale:

When I do book signings, most of my line is made up of young girls with their mothers, teen girls alone, and mother friend groups. But there’s usually at least one boy with a stack of my books. This boy is anywhere from 8-19, he’s carrying a worn stack of the Books of Bayern, and he’s excited and unashamed to be a fan of those books. As I talk to him, 95% of the time I learn this fact: he is home schooled.

There’s something that happens to our boys in school. Maybe it’s because they’re around so many other boys, and the pressure to be a boy is high. They’re looking around at each other, trying to figure out what it means to be a boy—and often their conclusion is to be “not a girl.” Whatever a girl is, they must be the opposite. So a book written by a girl? With a girl on the cover? Not something a boy should be caught reading.

But something else happens in school too. Without even meaning to perhaps, the adults in the boy’s life are nudging the boy away from “girl” books to “boy” books. When I go on tour and do school visits, sometimes the school will take the girls out of class for my assembly and not invite the boys. I talk about reading and how to fall in love with reading. I talk about storytelling and how to start your own story. I talk about things that aren’t gender-exclusive. But because I’m a girl and there are girls on my covers, often I’m deemed a girl-only author. I wonder, when a boy author goes to those schools with their books with boys on the covers, are the girls left behind? I want to question this practice. Even if no boy ever really would like one of my books, by not inviting them, we’re reinforcing the wrong and often-damaging notion that there’s girls-only stuff and you aren’t allowed to like it.

I hear from teachers that when they read Princess Academy in class (by far the most girlie-sounding of all my books) that the boys initially protest but in the end like it as much as the girls, or as one teacher told me recently, “the boys were even bigger fans than the girls.”

Another staple in my signing line is the family. The mom and daughters get their books signed, and the mom confides in me, “My son reads your books on the sly” or “My son loves your books too but he’s embarrassed to admit it.” Why are they embarrassed? Because we’ve made them that way. We’ve told them in subtle ways that, in order to be a real boy, to be manly, they can’t like anything girls like.

Though sometimes those instructions aren’t subtle at all. Recently at a signing, a family had all my books. The mom had me sign one of them for each of her children. A 10-year-old boy lurked in the back. I’d signed some for all the daughters and there were more books, so I asked the boy, “Would you like me to sign one to you?” The mom said, “Yeah, Isaac, do you want her to put your name in a girl book?” and the sisters all giggled.

As you can imagine, Isaac said no.

This is where I feel called to fight sexism. in these moments where girl things are “stupid” for boys.

I can read comics and like superheroes, but he can’t enjoy books with a lead female or like dolls because THAT’S FOR GIRLS AND IT’S LAME.

No. Girl stuff is not lame.  It’s just as cool as boy stuff, but sexism has put girl things in a category one step below boy things and that is unacceptable.

"Our advice to the press: Don’t seek professional safety through the even-handed, unfiltered presentation of opposing views. Which politician is telling the truth? Who is taking hostages, at what risks and to what ends?"  - The best line in that article we just posted. (via shortformblog)

think-progress:

REPORT: By a nearly 2 to 1 margin, cable networks call on men over women to comment on birth control

think-progress:

REPORT: By a nearly 2 to 1 margin, cable networks call on men over women to comment on birth control

inothernews:

Sammy Davis Jr. plants a historic TV kiss on Carroll O’Connor’s cheek in this Feb. 19, 1972 episode of All In The Family.  From the New York Times:

The Captain Kirk-Uhura kiss on “Star Trek” in 1968, compelled by telekinetic aliens, caused a stir, but the “All in the Family” kiss was more than a stir; it was in effect calling out a country that by 1972 routinely glorified black performers and athletes but was still full of people who thought and acted like Archie (Bunker, the show’s hyper-bigoted main character). The episode and the kiss have been making lists of top TV moments ever since.

inothernews:

Sammy Davis Jr. plants a historic TV kiss on Carroll O’Connor’s cheek in this Feb. 19, 1972 episode of All In The Family.  From the New York Times:

The Captain Kirk-Uhura kiss on “Star Trek” in 1968, compelled by telekinetic aliens, caused a stir, but the “All in the Family” kiss was more than a stir; it was in effect calling out a country that by 1972 routinely glorified black performers and athletes but was still full of people who thought and acted like Archie (Bunker, the show’s hyper-bigoted main character). The episode and the kiss have been making lists of top TV moments ever since.


When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.
Gina Torres | Black & Latino

When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black & Latino

newwavefeminism:

cool McDonalds & barbie… real cool…
image found via Racialicious, who had this to say about McDonalds history with racial insensitivity:

But, for a company that maintains a site called 365Black, McD’s has made other missteps. Like the infamous “Southern Style” sandwich commercials, which touched off such a furor that not only were they pulled from the air, but they’re nigh-impossible to find online. Even on YouTube. But, as AdSavvy recalled in calling it one of its “25 Most Racist Advertisements,” the commercial showed two black women waxing rhapsodic over “Grandma’s fried chicken.” Apparently it got worse from there. Also problematic: the unusually high number of commercials showing black people dancing, jumping, singing, etc.

newwavefeminism:

cool McDonalds & barbie… real cool…

image found via Racialicious, who had this to say about McDonalds history with racial insensitivity:

But, for a company that maintains a site called 365Black, McD’s has made other missteps. Like the infamous “Southern Style” sandwich commercials, which touched off such a furor that not only were they pulled from the air, but they’re nigh-impossible to find online. Even on YouTube. But, as AdSavvy recalled in calling it one of its “25 Most Racist Advertisements,” the commercial showed two black women waxing rhapsodic over “Grandma’s fried chicken.” Apparently it got worse from there. Also problematic: the unusually high number of commercials showing black people dancing, jumping, singing, etc.