THEME BY PISTACHI-O
brightwalldarkroom:

"If we were establishing a monument to Joan (not the worst idea ever), I’d demand it be two-fold. Half to honor whatever fantastical genetic engineering delivered her impossible physique. And the other half to her strength. There is an inexorable calm and mettle to Joan that makes me want to cry. I am petrified by her unflinching judgment and intoxicated by her ability to graciously deflect everything in which she does not wish to become entangled.
I am confused by her grace, so foreign to my brash, clumsy earnestness. By her ability to lead without recognition and keep afloat on the delicate crust of tactful, unceasingly appropriate professionalism that I’ve smashed through always, despite every attempt to be above gossip and provocation and injustice. How she manages the office and the men who pursue her and the women who begrudge her and the husband who fails her and does it all without stooping to tears but once.
For my part, I’ve almost never felt something I did not verbalize. Every emotion has gushed through me in loud roiling riptides and tsunamis. Erupting in howling wails at lovers and tears at work. In depthless anger and longing at parents and in wild, reckless joy at kindred spirits.
And anything I have not yelled, I have written and shared and over-shared. I own absolutely none of Don’s acumen for compartmentalization, none of Joan’s elegant ability to brush aside that which might be uncomfortable to hear. No share of Roger’s almost total irreverence, Anna Draper’s easy forgiveness, Sally’s preternatural calm.
As loudly and plainly as possible, I have presented my laments and talked through them laboriously. After all of which, you can assume: When I am devastated, you will know it. My comfort zone is the cacophony of modern desperation. When we are unhappy—incidentally or profoundly—there are an unbearable number of mediums to broadcast it and no expectation to hide it.
So this is the aspect of Mad Men that scares me most: the implication that every single character is so discreetly and quietly unhappy. Am I the only one that feels almost every last character is (to varying degrees and levels of awareness) desperately, wildly, deeply, paralyzingly unhappy? So unhappy they grapple and tear at and stampede and betray and smother each other in some savage effort to salvage their own lives.
Or maybe I am projecting. It’s impossible to tell if they’re happy, because they speak of the concept so infrequently it’s as though it has never even occurred to them. But I know I have never burned down a version of my life in which I was actually happy. Dumb and selfish and impulsive and impetuous as I have been in my youth, every single time I did the wrongest thing, it was not in an effort to hurt anyone else but solely to save myself (whether I realized it then or later).
And this crew? They are the most proficient of emotional arsonists.”
—Erica Cantoni, ”I Won’t Have My Heart Broken” (Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. June 2013)
(To read the rest of this essay, and the entire issue it originally appeared in, click here.)

brightwalldarkroom:

"If we were establishing a monument to Joan (not the worst idea ever), I’d demand it be two-fold. Half to honor whatever fantastical genetic engineering delivered her impossible physique. And the other half to her strength. There is an inexorable calm and mettle to Joan that makes me want to cry. I am petrified by her unflinching judgment and intoxicated by her ability to graciously deflect everything in which she does not wish to become entangled.

I am confused by her grace, so foreign to my brash, clumsy earnestness. By her ability to lead without recognition and keep afloat on the delicate crust of tactful, unceasingly appropriate professionalism that I’ve smashed through always, despite every attempt to be above gossip and provocation and injustice. How she manages the office and the men who pursue her and the women who begrudge her and the husband who fails her and does it all without stooping to tears but once.

For my part, I’ve almost never felt something I did not verbalize. Every emotion has gushed through me in loud roiling riptides and tsunamis. Erupting in howling wails at lovers and tears at work. In depthless anger and longing at parents and in wild, reckless joy at kindred spirits.

And anything I have not yelled, I have written and shared and over-shared. I own absolutely none of Don’s acumen for compartmentalization, none of Joan’s elegant ability to brush aside that which might be uncomfortable to hear. No share of Roger’s almost total irreverence, Anna Draper’s easy forgiveness, Sally’s preternatural calm.

As loudly and plainly as possible, I have presented my laments and talked through them laboriously. After all of which, you can assume: When I am devastated, you will know it. My comfort zone is the cacophony of modern desperation. When we are unhappy—incidentally or profoundly—there are an unbearable number of mediums to broadcast it and no expectation to hide it.

So this is the aspect of Mad Men that scares me most: the implication that every single character is so discreetly and quietly unhappy. Am I the only one that feels almost every last character is (to varying degrees and levels of awareness) desperately, wildly, deeply, paralyzingly unhappy? So unhappy they grapple and tear at and stampede and betray and smother each other in some savage effort to salvage their own lives.

Or maybe I am projecting. It’s impossible to tell if they’re happy, because they speak of the concept so infrequently it’s as though it has never even occurred to them. But I know I have never burned down a version of my life in which I was actually happy. Dumb and selfish and impulsive and impetuous as I have been in my youth, every single time I did the wrongest thing, it was not in an effort to hurt anyone else but solely to save myself (whether I realized it then or later).

And this crew? They are the most proficient of emotional arsonists.”


Erica Cantoni, ”I Won’t Have My Heart Broken” (Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. June 2013)


(To read the rest of this essay, and the entire issue it originally appeared in, click here.)

"In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on."  - Robert Frost (popular attribution)

John McVie and Stevie Nicks fool around during the Tusk photoshoot [x]

milkywhiteismybestfriend:

Johnny Depp arriving on set of Into the Woods.

 I don’t think he’s in costume, but if he is he’s still missing the makeup…

nooo I like Scott ;;w;; in fact I gave him a big ol eye stare to make up for his unbelongingness in riverrun

Scott is the Leonardo of the XMen.

Sometimes I hate how much I love “Go Your Own Way” because it’s about Stevie

and she had to sing that line about shacking up knowing it was supposed to be about her

and knowing everyone knew it was supposed to be about her

and I love Stevie

but I love “Go Your Own Way” too D:

"The Sound of Silence" just came on in whatever movie they’re watching downstairs and

idk man

some of my happiest memories are lying on the floor by my mother’s radio as she did crosswords and listened to the oldies station.

Some songs just take me back there and ugh I never want to leave.

I’d make her tea, sometimes we’d have a cat.

And some old folk-rock song from the 60s would be on and I would just close my eyes and need nothing else in the whole world.

Least favorite Bruce Springsteen songs by studio album 

lonelynightinthepark:

onionjulius:

  • Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.: Mary, Queen of Arkansas (lol “your soft hulk is reviving” w h u t)
  • The Wild, The Innocent, & the E Street Shuffle: DOES NOT EXIST
  • Born to Run: Jungleland
  • Darkness on the Edge of Town: Adam Raised a Cain
  • The River: Drive All Night? 
  • Nebraska: My Father’s House
  • Born in the USA: No Surrender/Bobby Jean (COME AT ME)
  • Tunnel of Love: Cautious Man/Walk Like a Man
  • Human Touch: 57 Channels (one does not simply like 57 Channels!)
  • The Ghost of Tom Joad: The New Timer
  • The Rising: Mary’s Place
  • Magic: You’ll Be Coming Down/Girls In Their Summer Clothes

That’s it that’s all I’ve got IDK about Lucky Town or Working on a Dream I can barely remember them >.>

Drive All Night?
No Surrender?
Bobby Jean?

Are you looking for a fight?

"“Sorrow” is about a person’s love affair with his own sadness. Sorrow is something they don’t want to lose. Maybe they’re told they should get over this—you know, take the pill and be happy. Sadness is not always the worst feeling. Sometimes it’s a really pleasurable thing to be overwhelmed with sadness. When I’m writing lyrics I’m listening to the music that those guys are sending me and usually drinking wine and just sort of falling into it, sort of losing myself and just writing down thoughts. As much as I try to not be so heavy, it’s just so much fun to think about these things and write songs about that stuff. “Sorrow” is almost a pop song to me. It’s a catchy ditty about sorrow."  - Matt Berninger

chacusha:

waltdisneyconfessions:

“I feel like people only think characters have a good personality if they are in your face all the time, are sarcastic, and make fun of other characters, while the characters who are more laid back, nice, positive, and not all over the place are seen as boring and personality-less”.

Like what people are saying in the notes, I feel like this is applicable generally, and not just a Disney fandom thing. What one person in real life might call a quiet, understated personality, another person might call boring. In movies, having a quiet personality that’s not exaggerated for humor or made a huge deal of can actually be indistinguishable from what is, critically-speaking, an underdeveloped or badly-written character. I think maybe it’s more noticeable in Disney fandom because there’s this weird Classic princess/Renaissance princess divide where people say Snow White/Cinderella/Briar Rose have no personality, even if they have a pretty darn normal personality (all three of them actually have pretty different personalities, I’d say). It’s just, looking at it from a filmmaking perspective, not much is actually made of their personalities.
I guess the question here is, “How can someone have more personality than another?” It’s a weird question but I think the answer is that the further outside of the realm of “normal” you get, the more people notice the personality, the more unique it appears, the more memorable it is. So if there’s never a time when this personality strikes you as odd or unique or is used for humor, you’ll more likely consider it as not counting as a personality at all.

chacusha:

waltdisneyconfessions:

“I feel like people only think characters have a good personality if they are in your face all the time, are sarcastic, and make fun of other characters, while the characters who are more laid back, nice, positive, and not all over the place are seen as boring and personality-less”.

Like what people are saying in the notes, I feel like this is applicable generally, and not just a Disney fandom thing. What one person in real life might call a quiet, understated personality, another person might call boring. In movies, having a quiet personality that’s not exaggerated for humor or made a huge deal of can actually be indistinguishable from what is, critically-speaking, an underdeveloped or badly-written character. I think maybe it’s more noticeable in Disney fandom because there’s this weird Classic princess/Renaissance princess divide where people say Snow White/Cinderella/Briar Rose have no personality, even if they have a pretty darn normal personality (all three of them actually have pretty different personalities, I’d say). It’s just, looking at it from a filmmaking perspective, not much is actually made of their personalities.

I guess the question here is, “How can someone have more personality than another?” It’s a weird question but I think the answer is that the further outside of the realm of “normal” you get, the more people notice the personality, the more unique it appears, the more memorable it is. So if there’s never a time when this personality strikes you as odd or unique or is used for humor, you’ll more likely consider it as not counting as a personality at all.

romulanholiday asked: MARG AND LORAS AS MAFIA SIBS idk it could work

"So Dad called a meeting?" Loras chuckled, casually fiddling with the daffodil in the breastpocket of his handsome olive suit as he languished around the mini-bar.  "Let me guess, Martell paid off all the easies down on Greenblood and now he’s upset that he’ll never come up with anything as good as ‘Martell Cartel’."

"It’s Grandmother’s meeting."

Loras sat down.