THEME BY PISTACHI-O

clockworkgate:

biscuitsarenice:

We Can’t Get Out Of The Bedroom Now.

Shirley Maclaine on Parkinson in 1975

Holy crap.

NGL I think this is a pretty damn interesting point.

wintesoldieriscoming:

tubooks:

The Academy and Diversity, by the Numbers By MELENA RYZIK

Apparently you can just LIST all the non-white, female winners of things on this chart and not even run out of room.
Let’s please take a moment to celebrate Kathryn Bigelow (lady!), Halle Berry (mixed race lady!),  Yul Brynner (mixed race), Sidney Poitier (black Bahamian-American), Ben Kingsley (mixed race), Denzel Washington (African-American), Jamie Foxx (African-American), Forest Whitaker (African-American).

wintesoldieriscoming:

tubooks:

The Academy and Diversity, by the Numbers By MELENA RYZIK

Apparently you can just LIST all the non-white, female winners of things on this chart and not even run out of room.

Let’s please take a moment to celebrate Kathryn Bigelow (lady!), Halle Berry (mixed race lady!),  Yul Brynner (mixed race), Sidney Poitier (black Bahamian-American), Ben Kingsley (mixed race), Denzel Washington (African-American), Jamie Foxx (African-American), Forest Whitaker (African-American).

fuckyeahfamousblackgirls:

Black Actresses and their Academy Awards!

5 out of the 6 actresses won for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, Hattie McDaniel being the first to win for her role in Gone with the Wind. Halle Berry is the only actress to win for Best Actress in a Leading Role, winning for her role in Monster’s Ball

Kerry Washington repping as the only WoC in THR's TV Actress Roundtable 

  • The Hollywood Reporter: What's your worst audition?
  • Connie Britton: "We just didn't get you."
  • Anna Gunn: "We just didn't respond to you."
  • Monica Potter: I'd just had my last kid..I was pushing like 180 pounds at the time. I'm like, "You guys, I just don't feel physically fit yet." I had my Spanx on and looked like a damn sausage, but I went in and thought I did a really good job. I got home and get the call from my agents. I'm like, "I did good, right?" And they say, "You did great. The problem is you're just …" "I'm too fat." "Yeah, we're just going to wait a little bit." I said, "I already told you this!" The weight thing is a crappy thing in this town, you know?
  • Elizabeth Moss: On the first season of "Mad Men," I had to wear a fat suit and prosthetic makeup to make me look bigger.... We all have this perception of what we're supposed to look like. But that's what's so great about all these women here today: We're all completely different-looking, you know? We're all beautiful, but real women.
  • Connie Britton: I agree. I've never had somebody say to me that I needed to look a certain way for a role, but I've always lived in dread of what that would be like. It's our responsibility to play these full-fledged women, and to play women who look like people we actually see in life. It's more interesting, and I think audiences appreciate it, too.
  • Kerry Washington: It's a little bit different for me because I'll audition for something and they'll just decide that they're not going "ethnic" with a character, which I hear a lot.
  • The Hollywood Reporter: Casting directors still use the word "ethnic"?
  • Kerry Washington: If not "black," then yeah. People have artistic license … that's what casting is: fitting the right look to the right character. Whereas you could maybe lose some weight, there's not really anything I can do, nor would I want to, about being black.

Too many ladies! 

delladilly:

it-goes-both-ways:

kisskicker:

“And the second reason was — during the years that I spent running Walt Disney Studios — I learned about how hard it was to find a fairy tale with a good strong male protagonist. You’ve got your Sleeping Beauties, your Cinderellas and your Alices. But a fairy tale with a male protagonist is very hard to come by. But with the origin story of the Wizard of Oz, here was a fairy tale story with a natural male protagonist. Which is why I knew that this was an idea for a movie that was genuinely worth pursuing.”

—Joe Roth, producer of Oz the Great and Powerful

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRGH

What’s the problem?

The number of good strong male characters in Disney films is approximately zero. Why are you so pissed off that someone wants to change that?

i am replying to this not remotely because you have a strong or remotely factually founded argument (p.s. everyone check that blog out; it’s hilarious and tragic) but because we started a list of disney [animated because i don’t have all day] male protags on twitter that i think is worth sharing:

aladdin, tarzan, kuzco, pacha, hercules, simba, peter pan, quasimodo, both the fox & the hound, pinocchio, taran, mickey, dumbo, the tramp, wart, mowgli, winnie the pooh, oliver, that mouse detective, bambi, mr toad, pongo, milo, jim, kenai, lewis, bolt, wreck-it ralph

and then of female protags, i bolded those characters in whose film a male supporting character still saved/resolved the narrative climax— which, we can talk about themes and power dynamics until the cows come home AND WE SHOULD, but at the end of the day, it is not ariel who defeats ursula

snow white, cinderella, sleeping beauty, alice in wonderland, ariel, belle, pocahontas, mulan, tiana, rapunzel

which is still ignoring all the films made by pixar under disney (all but one about men), all those films about dudes that i don’t know or care what they are, and all those films (the rescuers, the aristocats) in which arguably there are simultaneously a male and female protagonist but the narrative is still, like, super sexist

against women

sexist against women

so for those of you keeping track at home, disney’s record for animated movies with narrative resolving male vs. female protagonists is about 27:4.

thanks.

"The median age of an Academy Awards voter is 62. They are 94% Caucasian and 77% male."  - “10 things the Oscars won’t say.” Via Market Watch. (via climateadaptation)

Consider the Women

Please feel free to send this video out far and wide, and on Sunday, remember that women directors voices and visions are missing from this very large cultural conversation.   Telling people this is a cultural problem and not just a gender equity problem is a first step.

Oscar and the Usual Suspects 

The annual under-representation of women on the list of Oscar nominees is merely a symptom of the larger illness ailing the mainstream filmmaking industry in this country. According to the annual Celluloid Ceiling study released by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film, women comprised only 18 percent of all directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films in 2011.  This represents an increase of 2 percentage points from 2010 but a decrease of one percentage point from 2001.

By role, women accounted for 5 percent of directors, 14 percent of writers, 18 percent of executive producers, 25 percent of producers, 20 percent of editors, and 4 percent of cinematographers last year.  The abysmally low number of women working as directors is especially troubling, as women comprised 9 percent of directors in 1998—so much for creeping incrementalism.

The bottom line is that women can’t keep company with Oscar if they’re largely unable to gain employment in key roles.  It’s that simple. The filmmaking and nomination processes engage, consciously or not, their participants’ comfort levels. People feel most comfortable telling stories that reflect their own reality. People nominate individuals and stories they can relate to. There’s no grand conspiracy here. We feel most comfortable with those that look like us.

Oscar voters overwhelmingly white, male 

[…]

A Los Angeles Times study found that academy voters are markedly less diverse than the moviegoing public, and even more monolithic than many in the film industry may suspect. Oscar voters are nearly 94% Caucasian and 77% male, The Times found. Blacks are about 2% of the academy, and Latinos are less than 2%.

Oscar voters have a median age of 62, the study showed. People younger than 50 constitute just 14% of the membership.

[…]

The Times found that some of the academy’s 15 branches are almost exclusively white and male. Caucasians currently make up 90% or more of every academy branch except actors, whose roster is 88% white. The academy’s executive branch is 98% white, as is its writers branch.

Men compose more than 90% of five branches, including cinematography and visual effects. Of the academy’s 43-member board of governors, six are women; public relations executive Cheryl Boone Isaacs is the sole person of color.

[…]

Independent studies of some film crafts show that the academy’s demographics mirror the industry’s. Women make up 19% of the academy’s screenwriting branch, and a 2011 analysis by the Writers Guild of America, West found that women accounted for 17% of film writers employment. The academy’s producers branch is about 18% female, and the directors branch is 9% female, figures comparable to those in a study by San Diego State University’s Martha Lauzen. She examined the 250 top-grossing movies of 2011 and found that women accounted for 25% of all of the films’ producers, and 5% of all their directors.

[…]

In the past 83 years of Oscars, less than 4% of the acting awards have been bestowed on African Americans. Only one woman — Kathryn Bigelow — has received the Academy Award for directing “The Hurt Locker.”

[…]

The academy began making public the names of its invitees in 2004, but does not say which ones accept and become members.

The more than 1,000 people invited to join since 2004 include black actors such as Jennifer Hudson, Mo’Nique and Jeffrey Wright. But overall, the group was only slightly more diverse than the academy it was joining — 89% white and 73% male. Sherak pointed out that in 2011, the invitees were 30% female and 10% nonwhite.

The academy’s overall composition before and after the 2004 policy shift remained close to 93% Caucasian and 76% male, and its median age dropped from 64 to 62.

[…]

subconciousevolution:

Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue Pushes Actresses Of Color Aside (Again!)

The 2012 Hollywood Issue cover of Vanity Fair — shot by Mario Testino — features 11 “starlets” shot in satin and feathers for a “‘20s and ’30s boudoir feel.” The ladies on the power panel — the left third, aka the actual newsstand cover — are Rooney Mara, Mia Wasikowska, Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain. Pariah’s Adepero Oduye and Mission Impossible’s Paula Patton are the only two ladies of color, and they are not on the power panel, but on the right two-thirds of the cover, which is folded up and tucked away when on newsstands.

Full size

This cover (click to enlarge) is an improvement from the 2010 Young Hollywood cover, which only featured white actresses. But it upholds the unfortunate tradition of shoving the people of color to the right and off if the main panel. Something Vanity Fair has been doing for years. (Usually Annie Leibovitz has been the photographer.)

Full size

In 2011, Norman Jean Roy’s photograph had Anthony Mackie and Rashida Jones off to the right.


Full size

In 2008, it was Zoë Saldana and America Ferrera. (In 2007, Chris Rock was indeed on the cover and some penguins were on the right. 2006 was Tom Ford and some naked ladies. Black folks also appeared on the Hollywood issue cover in1998 — Djimon Hounsou — and 1999 — Thandie Newton.)


Full size

2005: Rosario Dawson, Ziyi Zhang and Kerry Washington, on the right and not the left.


Full size

2004: Salma Hayek and Lucy Liu, on the right and not the left power panel.


Full size

2003: Samuel L. Jackson and Don Cheadle, off the cover.


Full size

2002, Rosario Dawson.


Full size

In 2001, no black ladies were pushed aside because no black ladies were photographed!


Full size

1997: Jada Pinkett and Jennifer Lopez on the right.


Full size

1996: Will Smith on the right.


Full size


1995: Angela Basset on the right
2011 was supposedly the whitest Oscars in 10 years. This year, thanks to the decidedly controversial flick The Help, Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer have been nominated (and winning!) some major awards. But it’s pretty obvious that Hollywood has a serious problem with diversity. A headline on ColorLines yesterday read: Why is Hollywood So Afraid of Black Women? Of course, it’s not just women; George Lucas recently accused Hollywood of being so racist even he, a successful filmmaker, had trouble getting Red Tails distributed, since it has an all-black cast.
America has a black president. We also have black actresses being recognized for playing maids in a film based on a book written by a white woman who got sued by her family’s black maid who claims the story is “embarrassing” and “emotionally upsetting.” Hollywood might be one of our biggest exports to the rest of the world, but it’s pretty clear it needs an overhaul. Fast.
Read the Article Here. 

subconciousevolution:

Vanity Fair’s Hollywood Issue Pushes Actresses Of Color Aside (Again!)


The 2012 Hollywood Issue cover of Vanity Fair — shot by Mario Testino — features 11 “starlets” shot in satin and feathers for a “‘20s and ’30s boudoir feel.” The ladies on the power panel — the left third, aka the actual newsstand cover — are Rooney Mara, Mia Wasikowska, Jennifer Lawrence and Jessica Chastain. Pariah’s Adepero Oduye and Mission Impossible’s Paula Patton are the only two ladies of color, and they are not on the power panel, but on the right two-thirds of the cover, which is folded up and tucked away when on newsstands.

This cover (click to enlarge) is an improvement from the 2010 Young Hollywood cover, which only featured white actresses. But it upholds the unfortunate tradition of shoving the people of color to the right and off if the main panel. Something Vanity Fair has been doing for years. (Usually Annie Leibovitz has been the photographer.)

In 2011, Norman Jean Roy’s photograph had Anthony Mackie and Rashida Jones off to the right.

In 2008, it was Zoë Saldana and America Ferrera. (In 2007, Chris Rock was indeed on the cover and some penguins were on the right. 2006 was Tom Ford and some naked ladies. Black folks also appeared on the Hollywood issue cover in1998 — Djimon Hounsou — and 1999 — Thandie Newton.)

2005: Rosario Dawson, Ziyi Zhang and Kerry Washington, on the right and not the left.

2004: Salma Hayek and Lucy Liu, on the right and not the left power panel.

2003: Samuel L. Jackson and Don Cheadle, off the cover.

2002, Rosario Dawson.

In 2001, no black ladies were pushed aside because no black ladies were photographed!

1997: Jada Pinkett and Jennifer Lopez on the right.

1996: Will Smith on the right.

1995: Angela Basset on the right

2011 was supposedly the whitest Oscars in 10 years. This year, thanks to the decidedly controversial flick The Help, Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer have been nominated (and winning!) some major awards. But it’s pretty obvious that Hollywood has a serious problem with diversity. A headline on ColorLines yesterday read: Why is Hollywood So Afraid of Black Women? Of course, it’s not just women; George Lucas recently accused Hollywood of being so racist even he, a successful filmmaker, had trouble getting Red Tails distributed, since it has an all-black cast.

America has a black president. We also have black actresses being recognized for playing maids in a film based on a book written by a white woman who got sued by her family’s black maid who claims the story is “embarrassing” and “emotionally upsetting.” Hollywood might be one of our biggest exports to the rest of the world, but it’s pretty clear it needs an overhaul. Fast.

Read the Article Here. 

Roger Ebert: I'll tell you why movie revenue is dropping... 

1. Obviously, the absence of a must-see mass-market movie. […]

2. Ticket prices are too high. […]

3. The theater experience. […]

4. Refreshment prices. […]

5. Competition from other forms of delivery. […]

6. Lack of choice. Box-office tracking shows that the bright spot in 2011 was the performance of indie, foreign or documentary films [this has arguably been the case since 1989 with Soderbergh’s Sex, Lies, and Videotape]. On many weekends, one or more of those titles captures first-place in per-screen average receipts. Yet most moviegoers outside large urban centers can’t find those titles in their local gigantiplex. Instead, all the shopping center compounds seem to be showing the same few overhyped disappointments. Those films open with big ad campaigns, play a couple of weeks, and disappear.

The myth that small-town moviegoers don’t like “art movies” is undercut by Netflix’s viewing results; the third most popular movie on Dec. 28 on Netflix was “Certified Copy,” by the Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. You’ve heard of [him]? In fourth place—French director Alain Corneau’s “Love Crime.” In fifth, “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo“—but the subtitled Swedish version.

The message I get is that Americans love the movies as much as ever. It’s the theaters that are losing their charm. Proof: theaters thrive that police their audiences, show a variety of titles and emphasize value-added features. The rest of the industry can’t depend forever on blockbusters to bail it out.

bidonica:

ladyofriverrun:

Why Aren’t More Women Who Loved the Dragon Tattoo Book Planning to See the Movie?

Rather, it is likely the unforgivingly creepy and dark marketing for the movie that has scared off female fans of the book. Says another marketing exec, “Hyper-realistic violence against women is very different from the average horror movie. They’re escapist, ‘movie-date’ oriented. This is different, and I suspect the female numbers [Sony does] have are inflated by title recognition, not actual desire. Do women really want to see a movie like this at this time of year?”

[…]

A third marketing insider put the film’s lack of success with connecting to its female fans this way: “I am surprised by those female [tracking] numbers, but I am not surprised that women don’t want to see an ultraviolent David Fincher movie about women being tortured and raped. I think women see these trailers and are being scared shitless away from it.” The consensus of marketing solons is that Sony’s dark, $125 million gamble will still open — they estimate it’s likely to pull in between $40 to 50 million over six days — but that its director’s singular vision means it could have done a lot better. This is likely why Sony is moving the movie up; adding one more day will help the film both gather a more impressive opening-weekend number to tout and allow positive word of mouth to spread.

Because lol, David Fincher is totally well-known for his pro-women movies so you totally chose the right director there, didn’t you?

Also I lol’d at Cosmo Landsman in The Sunday Times calling Steig Larsson an “uber right-on feminist” in the most patronising way possible as if it’s a bad thing. Like, you gave a better review to a Lars Von Trier film so fuck you, tbh.

I have to admit that the marketing scared me shitless for this film, and I can’t see many of my friends to be keen for this (lol, what else is new?) but me and my family, as we all LOVED the books, are planning on hitting it up big time on Boxing Day!

Tbh I didn’t really find the marketing *scary* as much as annoyingly glamorized? It is a very brutal story, and let’s be honest - the novels aren’t great, but Lisbeth’s arc is pretty powerful, and I think it’s the strength of her character that appeals the most the female audience, combined with the fact that the male co-protagonist, Blomkvist, is kind of the passive, observing half of the duo, the yin to Lisbeth’s yang. And that’s nice to see for once? Then I went to check the article above and I found another one linked in the comments:

Read More

Why Aren’t More Women Who Loved the Dragon Tattoo Book Planning to See the Movie?  

Rather, it is likely the unforgivingly creepy and dark marketing for the movie that has scared off female fans of the book. Says another marketing exec, “Hyper-realistic violence against women is very different from the average horror movie. They’re escapist, ‘movie-date’ oriented. This is different, and I suspect the female numbers [Sony does] have are inflated by title recognition, not actual desire. Do women really want to see a movie like this at this time of year?”

[…]

A third marketing insider put the film’s lack of success with connecting to its female fans this way: “I am surprised by those female [tracking] numbers, but I am not surprised that women don’t want to see an ultraviolent David Fincher movie about women being tortured and raped. I think women see these trailers and are being scared shitless away from it.” The consensus of marketing solons is that Sony’s dark, $125 million gamble will still open — they estimate it’s likely to pull in between $40 to 50 million over six days — but that its director’s singular vision means it could have done a lot better. This is likely why Sony is moving the movie up; adding one more day will help the film both gather a more impressive opening-weekend number to tout and allow positive word of mouth to spread.

Women Directed Movies in 2011 

I thought it would be good to look at ALL the movies directed by women this year in order to get a decent assessment of where we are going on two years after Kathryn Bigelow won the best director award.

Looking back to last year both Winter’s Bone and The Kids Are All Right were a part of the year end discussion in a big way and both films nabbed Oscar nominations.  But neither Debra Granik nor Lisa Cholodenko were nominated for best director.

This year I feel we are in the same boat and quite frankly the strong films directed by women that could be in the awards mix are not generating a lot of buzz.

Things to note:

Only 2 women — Jennifer Yuh and Catherine Hardwicke made it into the top 100, and only two more Lone Scherfig and Larysa Kondracki made it into the top 200)

That’s 4 women directed films in the top 200 grossing films of the year.  (of course there are a few that haven’t still opened and one in particular Arthur Christmas seems poised to get into the top 100 if not top 50.)  Aside from box office grosses there are only 23 women on this list, and if you look at the films there are only a handful that made it out of NY and LA.  I am duly depressed.

[…]

Do We Still Need Women's Film Festivals? 

But 2012 will lack a festival that has become vital to our culture. Women still make up less than 10% of film directors and 15% of screenwriters. That means that around 90% of the stories we are told through film – stories which influence our culture and our inner worlds – come from a male perspective. Birds Eye View has provided a cultural oasis in which we get to see and celebrate the full potential of that missing half. You hear it said that times of cuts are good for culture: “talent will out”. But we do not live in an equal world. If we lose the best efforts of the last decade to counter inequality, we will lose access to the creative vision of half the population. And what a loss of creativity that would be.