THEME BY PISTACHI-O

condomdepot:

buddhabrot:

femininefreak:

Sex Education in American Public Schools

every one makes fun of New Jersey but it fucking rules

Wow, these graphs really put the lack of proper sex education in school into perspective. 

Morning News Read 10 October 2013. 

inothernews:

image

"In Britain, students don’t begin paying off their loans until they find stable employment, and the cost is in proportion to their earnings. Australia similarly ties the cost of paying off the loan to the income of the graduate. In Denmark, education is considered a right by the people and an investment by the government, and is therefore free. Some students are even offered a stipend by the government to defray costs. Norway has a similar system of higher education, and in Sweden, students pay only a small fee.

In America? The university is considered a commodity, one that can easily be purchased by the wealthy, but not the poor. These approaches represent a fundamentally different cultural attitude: elsewhere, education is a public good, an investment or a right; in the U.S., it’s a privilege reserved for wealthy elites."  -

Does America hate millennials? (via smdxn)

Is water wet?

(via howtobeterrell)

jtotheizzoe:

“I Am a Scientist”

Mates of State cover Guided by Voices to promote girls in science

The problems are clear. Science and technology fields hold the jobs of the future, but our young women aren’t being prepared effectively to lead, or even compete. Interest in science is equal among younger girls and boys, and then diverges from middle school onward. There’s many culprits to blame, and most of them are social.

So again we ask: How do we fix it?

There’s wrong ways. And then there’s really wrong ways, like last week’s “Science, It’s A Girl Thing” fiasco. You don’t encourage girls in science by creating unrealistic role models and more stereotypes. That’s why I love the soon-to-be-released Science Fair album, especially this track from Mates of State.

To me, it captures all the right stuff about science. The happy curiosity, the proud young girl hard at work on what makes her feel good, and getting to prove the naysayers wrong in the end. I love that the full album features tracks that serve to inspire young girls in education, all performed by female singers, and that all of the proceeds will go to girls’ STEM programs through Girls, Inc..

If you’d like more information on the Science Fair album, check out their website. 

(Special thanks to video director Lindsay Van Dyke for sending this my way)

"Science is the elegant truth in the messy stramash of history. Folklore and bias are all reflected in the science of each culture. How science is applied tells us about our mores and priorities. Every year, in groups of twenty, my students pick apart the fabric of their living world and discover that they are critical cogs in a wonderful ecological machine. Over and over, I get to see my students marvel at the tiny workings of their cells and be horrified by the biological bombs that are exotic species. I accept their dissonance and skepticism, and I repay them with evidence and data."  - I Am Science - Life in the Nerdlet Estuary (via Not Exactly Rocket Science)

"

Black students, especially boys, face much harsher discipline in public schools than other students, according to new data from the Department of Education.

Although black students made up only 18 percent of those enrolled in the schools sampled, they accounted for 35 percent of those suspended once, 46 percent of those suspended more than once and 39 percent of all expulsions, according to the Civil Rights Data Collection’s 2009-10 statistics from 72,000 schools in 7,000 districts, serving about 85 percent of the nation’s students. The data covered students from kindergarten age through high school.

One in five black boys and more than one in 10 black girls received an out-of-school suspension. Over all, black students were three and a half times as likely to be suspended or expelled than their white peers.

And in districts that reported expulsions under zero-tolerance policies, Hispanic and black students represent 45 percent of the student body, but 56 percent of those expelled under such policies.

“Education is the civil rights of our generation,” said Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, in a telephone briefing with reporters on Monday. “The undeniable truth is that the everyday education experience for too many students of color violates the principle of equity at the heart of the American promise.”

"  - The New York Times, “Black Students Face More Discipline, Data Suggest” (via inothernews)

osmium:

mdt:

Back off man, I’m a scientist.
via Star Power

A young Neil deGrasse Tyson. From the article:

Frank Bash, professor emeritus of astronomy and former director of UT’s McDonald Observatory, supervised Tyson as a teaching assistant for Intro to Astronomy. “Neil had a natural gift for teaching,” Bash says. “After he taught, the students would beg for him back. He did crazy stuff—moonwalking in class.”
Doing the moonwalk for his students wasn’t a gag, Tyson says—it was a strategy. “If you’re only using words to communicate as a teacher, why show up?” he says. “Why not just type your notes? Teaching is a full-body performance. The moonwalk was all the rage in 1983, and the students loved it. It made the material work for them.”
According to Tyson, one of the biggest reasons scientists so often struggle to communicate research to the public is not jargon or lack of interest. It’s a culture gap.
“The average person watches 30 hours of television per week,” he says. “But the average professor doesn’t own a TV, let alone watch the Kardashians or cute kitten videos on YouTube or whatever. And people live for that stuff. We have to speak their language.”

osmium:

mdt:

Back off man, I’m a scientist.

via Star Power

A young Neil deGrasse Tyson. From the article:

Frank Bash, professor emeritus of astronomy and former director of UT’s McDonald Observatory, supervised Tyson as a teaching assistant for Intro to Astronomy. “Neil had a natural gift for teaching,” Bash says. “After he taught, the students would beg for him back. He did crazy stuff—moonwalking in class.”

Doing the moonwalk for his students wasn’t a gag, Tyson says—it was a strategy. “If you’re only using words to communicate as a teacher, why show up?” he says. “Why not just type your notes? Teaching is a full-body performance. The moonwalk was all the rage in 1983, and the students loved it. It made the material work for them.”

According to Tyson, one of the biggest reasons scientists so often struggle to communicate research to the public is not jargon or lack of interest. It’s a culture gap.

“The average person watches 30 hours of television per week,” he says. “But the average professor doesn’t own a TV, let alone watch the Kardashians or cute kitten videos on YouTube or whatever. And people live for that stuff. We have to speak their language.”

So basically

no government standards for education

not even on a state level

I’m not cut out to be a Santorum conservative.  That’s my lesson of the evening.

Hard Truths: Minority Scholarships 

moobar4lyfe:

Excerpt from this post:

White Men are the new minority. They can’t get scholarships for school because of the colored and lady folk. Except, that’s not true. Not even a little bit.
[…]

Well, I have the numbers for the Nationwide study. I’ll admit it, these are the numbers that dance in my head when I hear “White people/white men are the new minorities.” Ready? Here we go…

White: Scholarship Recipients-798,400 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$1,891 Million

Black: Scholarship Recipients-129,000 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$345 Million

Latino: Scholarship Recipients-103,900 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$236 Million

Asian: Scholarship Recipients-52,800 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$186 Million

American Indian: Scholarship Recipients-19,000 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$56 Million

Native Hawaiian: Scholarship Recipients-6,200 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$30 Million

Multi-Racial: Scholarship Recipients-40,200 Total Private Scholarship Funding-$156 Million

The study goes on to say that LESS THAN FIVE PERCENT of ALL scholarships and LESS THAT TEN PERCENT of INDIVIDUAL scholarships consider the student’s race among their eligibility criteria. Soooooooo….What were you saying about white men being the new minority?

With all this information, I was still able to find page after page of race baiting white only scholarships. The sick part is that although I was able to find many white only scholarships, I was not able to find one (at least not on any web site that I looked at) that didn’t preface the information with some form of “Minorities get everything handed to them. Now it’s our turn.”

jtotheizzoe:

good:

It’s Time to Bust the Myth That Girls Don’t Like Science
Research shows that girls are interested in STEM fields, but aren’t given information about the opportunities. If schools focus their efforts on ensuring that girls are informed about STEM opportunities, the number of women becoming computer scientists, engineers, and mathematicians is sure to soar.
Read it on GOOD→ 

Looking through my followers list is proof enough for me that there are loads of young women interested in STEM fields, whether it’s for their job or just expressing their identity.
We need to show them the opportunities. We need to engage them in the opportunities. And we need to fight the other social pressures that pull them away from positive feelings about science.

jtotheizzoe:

good:

It’s Time to Bust the Myth That Girls Don’t Like Science

Research shows that girls are interested in STEM fields, but aren’t given information about the opportunities. If schools focus their efforts on ensuring that girls are informed about STEM opportunities, the number of women becoming computer scientists, engineers, and mathematicians is sure to soar.

Read it on GOOD 

Looking through my followers list is proof enough for me that there are loads of young women interested in STEM fields, whether it’s for their job or just expressing their identity.

We need to show them the opportunities. We need to engage them in the opportunities. And we need to fight the other social pressures that pull them away from positive feelings about science.

"The difference between science and the arts is not that they are different sides of the same coin even, or even different parts of the same continuum, but rather, they are manifestations of the same thing. The arts and sciences are avatars of human creativity."  - Mae Jamison, TED2002 (via jtotheizzoe)

"

WHEN we don’t get the results we want in our military endeavors, we don’t blame the soldiers. We don’t say, “It’s these lazy soldiers and their bloated benefits plans! That’s why we haven’t done better in Afghanistan!” No, if the results aren’t there, we blame the planners. We blame the generals, the secretary of defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff. No one contemplates blaming the men and women fighting every day in the trenches for little pay and scant recognition.

And yet in education we do just that. When we don’t like the way our students score on international standardized tests, we blame the teachers. When we don’t like the way particular schools perform, we blame the teachers and restrict their resources.

"  -

The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries (via lawsonry)

EXACTLY. YES.

(editorial by Dave Eggers and Ninive Clements Calegari! (of 826 National))