THEME BY PISTACHI-O

Emily (derivativeworks) - yes, until Saturday!!

Smells like New York alright.

Smells like New York alright.

cavernsoftheirteeth:

like look i have stanned for many women i felt were terribly treated by their narratives and i think you can like a character while recognizing shitty elements to their writing but i swear half the time people are like “oh no that’s actually a really well written feminist character you just need to look past her lack of screen time and fridging for a male character and all the long shots of her boobs why are you unwilling to do that are you sexist or something”

epsilonics asked: Once you get this you have to say 5 things you like about yourself, publicly, then send this to ten of your favourite followers :)
  1. I like my cheekbones.
  2. I like being both independent and social.
  3. I think I’m essentially honest and I don’t play head games with people.
  4. I think I’m a good general learner.
  5. I try hard to become a better person, both in terms of accomplishment and … goodness.
  • person: i hate cats
  • me: what the fuck

"Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called i–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors."  - Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Books and Authors You Had to Read in High School (via bookriot)

This US Open women’s draw can just kiss my ass.

Interview with Maryam Mirzakhani, the brilliant Iranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields Medal 

  • Interviewer: What advice would you give lay persons who would
  •  like to know more about mathematics—what it is,
  •  what its role in our society has been and so on?
  •  What should they read? How should they proceed?
  • Dr. Mirzakhani: This is a difficult question. I don’t think that everyone
  •  should become a mathematician, but I do believe that
  •  many students don’t give mathematics a real chance.
  •  I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle
  •  school; I was just not interested in thinking about it.
  •  I can see that without being excited mathematics can
  •  look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics
  •  only shows itself to more patient followers.
racheforthestars asked: DUDE now all my hope is in Roger too!! And Grigor + Maria :) What's your favorite US Open moment so far this year?

I guess Roger hitting the tweener against Marinko’s back? Cici Bellis was a nice enough story though we’ve seen similar things like that before. It’s still pretty early yet and the men’s draw has been kind of sleepy (fine with me considering), meanwhile the women’s draw is just full of disappointments.

I did think Venus played a great match with Sara today, it was a very entertaining third set.

nprbooks:

Image via Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for USC Shoah Foundation
Today in Book News: Bruce Springsteen is writing a children’s book about a bank-robbing baby called Outlaw Pete, based on his song of the same name. “Outlaw Pete is essentially the story of a man trying to outlive and outrun his sins,” Springsteen said in a statement. The song “Outlaw Pete” was inspired by the 1950 children’s book Brave Cowboy Bill. 
Also today, Quyen Nguyenhas an interview with Tobias Wolff in the Boston Review. Asked about the relationship between literature and politics, Wolff said: “I think it is a political act to force someone to enter the mind, the spirit, the perspective of another human being.”
And the DC Public Library has hired a social worker to help homeless patrons. Social worker Jean Badalamenti told thePost, "Because the libraries tend to be gathering places for people without homes, it’s important to be part of the citywide conversation about how we’re going to address homelessness, health services and moving people out of homelessness."
Read more here.

nprbooks:

Image via Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for USC Shoah Foundation

Today in Book NewsBruce Springsteen is writing a children’s book about a bank-robbing baby called Outlaw Pete, based on his song of the same name. “Outlaw Pete is essentially the story of a man trying to outlive and outrun his sins,” Springsteen said in a statement. The song “Outlaw Pete” was inspired by the 1950 children’s book Brave Cowboy Bill

Also today, Quyen Nguyenhas an interview with Tobias Wolff in the Boston Review. Asked about the relationship between literature and politics, Wolff said: “I think it is a political act to force someone to enter the mind, the spirit, the perspective of another human being.”

And the DC Public Library has hired a social worker to help homeless patrons. Social worker Jean Badalamenti told thePost, "Because the libraries tend to be gathering places for people without homes, it’s important to be part of the citywide conversation about how we’re going to address homelessness, health services and moving people out of homelessness."

Read more here.

This US Open is dead to me.